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Bovine colostrum



Interactions

Bovine colostrum/Drug Interactions:
  • GeneralGeneral: According to one secondary source, there are no drug interactions associated with bovine colostrum. However, it suggests that the bowel healing support associated with bovine colostrum may result in the need for reducing or eliminating the use of other herbal or nutritional supplements. Furthermore, the number of compounds in bovine colostrum is large, although levels may be small, and each may have unknown effects or interactions with other drugs or herbal supplements.
  • AntibioticsAntibiotics: Several laboratory studies have indicated bovine colostrum's antimicrobial effects (58; 59; 60; 61; 62; 63; 64; 65; 66; 67). Additional human study is warranted to determine clinical significance.
  • Antidiabetic agentsAntidiabetic agents: Results from in vitro studies suggest that the presence of insulin in bovine colostrum is at least partially responsible for some of its effects (48). Thus, using insulin in combination with bovine colostrum may have additive effects.
  • AntidiarrhealsAntidiarrheals: Results from clinical trials in humans suggest an antidiarrheal effect of bovine colostrum (42; 17). Thus, combined use with antidiarrheal agents may have additive effects.
  • Antineoplastic agentsAntineoplastic agents: TGF(BC-1), isolated from bovine colostrum, suppressed growth of osteogenic sarcoma cells (MG-63) in vitro (68). Bovine colostrum is a source of IGF-1. Several studies have found that IGF-1 levels correlate with the risk of prostate cancer and colorectal cancer in men, premenopausal breast cancer in women, and lung cancer in both men and women (50; 51; 52; 53; 54). Not all studies agree with these findings (55; 56), and it is not clear how this relates to the use of bovine colostrum.
  • AntioxidantsAntioxidants: Human colostrum is a rich source of the antioxidant CoQ10 (6). It is not known if bovine colostrum also contains CoQ10.
  • Antiviral agentsAntiviral agents: Pacyna et al. determined rotavirus antibody activity in the feces of children given hyperimmune bovine colostrum from cows immunized to rotavirus (69).
  • CNS agentsCNS agents: Information from websites suggests that bovine colostrum may affect the brain's mood-regulating chemicals (serotonin and dopamine). Thus, combined use with other agents that affect the CNS may have additive or contradictory effects.
  • Exercise performance enhancersExercise performance enhancers: In humans, there is conflicting data regarding the use of bovine colostrums for increasing laboratory parameters of exercise performance enhancement (20; 29; 22). It is unclear whether bovine colostrums would interact with other exercise performance enhancers in humans.
  • ImmunomodulatorsImmunomodulators: Based on numerous in vitro human and animal studies, colostrum is a source of secretory IgA (2), and thus may have effects on the immune system, although clinical significance in humans is unknown (33; 70; 71; 72; 49).
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs)Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs): In a human study, colostrum that had been spray-dried and defatted reduced the rise in NSAID-induced gut permeability (73).

Bovine colostrum/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • AntibacterialsAntibacterials: Several laboratory studies have indicated bovine colostrum's antimicrobial effects (58; 59; 60; 61; 62; 63; 64; 65; 66; 67). Additional human study is warranted to determine clinical significance.
  • AntidiarrhealsAntidiarrheals: Results from clinical trials in humans suggest an antidiarrheal effect of bovine colostrum (42; 17). Thus, combined use with herbal antidiarrheal agents, such as aloe vera, wheat grass juice, and Boswellia serrata, may have additive effects.
  • Anti-inflammatory herbsAnti-inflammatory herbs: In a human study, colostrum that had been spray-dried and defatted reduced the rise in NSAID-induced gut permeability (73). In theory, colostrums may alter the effects of herbs with anti-inflammatory effects.
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: TGF(BC-1), isolated from bovine colostrum, suppressed growth of osteogenic sarcoma cells (MG-63) in vitro (68). Bovine colostrum is a source of IGF-1. Several studies have found that IGF-1 levels correlate with the risk of prostate cancer and colorectal cancer in men, premenopausal breast cancer in women, and lung cancer in both men and women (50; 51; 52; 53; 54). Not all studies agree with these findings (55; 56), and it is not clear how this relates to the use of bovine colostrum.
  • AntioxidantsAntioxidants: Human colostrum is a rich source of the antioxidant CoQ10 (6). It is not known if bovine colostrum also contains CoQ10.
  • AntiviralsAntivirals: Pacyna et al. determined rotavirus antibody activity in the feces of children given hyperimmune bovine colostrum from cows immunized to rotavirus (69).
  • CNS agentsCNS agents: Information from websites suggests that bovine colostrum may affect the brain's mood-regulating chemicals (serotonin and dopamine). Thus, combined use with other agents that affect the CNS may have additive or contradictory effects.
  • CoQ10CoQ10: Human colostrum contains CoQ10 (6). Thus, it is likely that bovine colostrum also contains CoQ10. Combined use with CoQ10 supplements may have additive effects.
  • Exercise performance enhancersExercise performance enhancers: In humans, there is conflicting data regarding the use of bovine colostrums for increasing laboratory parameters of exercise performance enhancement (20; 29; 22). It is unclear whether bovine colostrums would interact with other exercise performance enhancers in humans.
  • HypoglycemicsHypoglycemics: Results from in vitro studies suggest that the presence of insulin in bovine colostrum is at least partially responsible for some of its effects (48). Thus, using herbs or supplements with hypoglycemic effects in combination with bovine colostrum may have additive effects.
  • ImmunomodulatorsImmunomodulators: Based on numerous in vitro human and animal studies, colostrum is a source of secretory IgA (2), and thus may have effects on the immune system, although clinical significance in humans is unknown (33; 70; 71; 72; 49).

Bovine colostrum/Food Interactions:
  • XylitolXylitol: In vitro, both xylitol and bovine colostrum inhibited the adhesion of the bacteria Clostridium difficile to intestinal Caco-2 cells (64). Thus, combined use may have additive effects.

Bovine colostrum/Lab Interactions:
  • Blood lactate/pHBlood lactate/pH: In a human trial, bovine colostrum increased blood buffer capacity, based on lactate and pH levels, after exercise (22).
  • C-reactive protein (CRP)C-reactive protein (CRP): In cardiac patients treated with bovine colostrum, plasma inflammatory CRP concentrations decreased less in the bovine colostrum group than the control group, following surgery (38).
  • Drug dopingDrug doping: Although bovine colostrum may contain ingredients, such as IGF-1 and growth hormone, which are on the doping list of the International Olympic Committee, use of bovine colostrum did not elicit a positive doping response (74). Some scientists believe more research is needed in this area in order to better characterize the effects of colostrum on athletic performance (31).
  • IgAIgA: In athletes, bovine colostrum supplementation increased s-IgA levels (39).
  • IGFIGF: In humans, daily supplementation with 60g of bovine colostrum for four weeks had no effect on blood levels of IGF-I or IGF binding protein-3 levels (74). In a separate study, a bovine colostrum supplement increased serum IGF-I concentration in athletes during strength and speed training (75).
  • IgGIgG: In humans, specific bovine IgG against C. difficile toxin A was detected in ileal (intestinal) fluid following oral supplementation with bovine colostrum (76).
  • ImmunoassaysImmunoassays: Bovine colostrum use may increase circulating antibodies to bovine immunoglobulin and may interfere with immunoassay results (77).
  • Interleukin-6 (IL-6)Interleukin-6 (IL-6): In cardiac patients treated with bovine colostrum, plasma IL-6 concentrations decreased less in the bovine colostrum group than in the control group, following surgery (38).
  • Salivary antibodiesSalivary antibodies: In infants, salivary antibody measurements may be inaccurate due to presence of antibodies in the mouth from colostrum or breast milk (78). Supplementation with bovine colostrum may have a similar effect on this measurement.

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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