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Chasteberry (Vitex agnus-castus)



Interactions

Chasteberry/Drug Interactions:
  • AntiandrogensAntiandrogens: In animals, chasteberry possessed antiandrogenic effects (18), noting that a flavonoid-rich fraction of chasteberry administered to male dogs resulted in disruption of the latter stages of spermatogenesis.
  • AntibioticsAntibiotics: Ethanolic and etheric extracts of chaste tree demonstrate in vitro antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcusaureus, Streptococcus faecalis (6.5-20% extracts), Salmonella, Escherichia coli (10-20%), Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. pseudotropicalis and C. kruesi (10-40%). Chasteberry extracts have also demonstrated high levels of toxicity against the mycelial growth of Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Epidermophyton floccosum, Microsporum canis, M. gypseum (1.5-12%) and Penicillium virdicatum (9-23%) (50). Essential oil from chasteberry has shown greater activity against E. coli and C. albicans than against S. aureus or Bacillus anthracoides (51). Five flavonoids and two iridoids extracted from Vitex agnus-castus possess inhibitory action against Bacillus cereus, B. megaterium, and Staph. aureus (52).
  • AntidepressantsAntidepressants: In humans, depression scores were lowered with chasteberry use (42; 21; 38).
  • AntipsychoticsAntipsychotics: According to a systematic review, chastetree may be contraindicated for use with antipsychotics (6).
  • BromocriptineBromocriptine: According to a systematic review, chastetree may be contraindicated for use with bromocriptine (6).
  • ContraceptivesContraceptives: According to in vitro study, chasteberry may increase plasma levels of estrogens and progesterone (19; 20). According to a systematic review, chastetree may cause adverse effects when used in combination with hormone replacement therapy or oral contraceptives (6).
  • DiureticsDiuretics: In humans, participants administered chasteberry showed a significantly lower score for water retention (21).
  • Dopamine agonistsDopamine agonists: The dopaminergic effects of chasteberry extracts have been studied (53). In animal and in vitro studies, chasteberry has been shown to bind to D-2 receptors, inhibiting prolactin secretion (22; 23). According to a systematic review, chastetree may be contraindicated for use with dopamine agonists (6). Haloperidol, a dopamine agonist, was able to counteract the prolactin-lowering effect of chasteberry (24).
  • Dopamine antagonistsDopamine antagonists: The dopaminergic effects of chasteberry extracts have been studied (53). In animal and in vitro studies, chasteberry has been shown to bind to D-2 receptors, inhibiting prolactin secretion (22; 23).
  • Hormonal agentsHormonal agents: Chasteberry has been studied for modulation of estrogenic activity (54). In vitro, constituents in chasteberry bind selectively to estrogen receptor beta (19; 20). Apigenin, a flavonoid, has been identified as an active phytoestrogen in chasteberry. According to a systematic review, chastetree may cause adverse effects when used in combination with hormone replacement therapy or oral contraceptives (6).
  • Hormone replacement therapyHormone replacement therapy: Chasteberry has been studied for modulation of estrogenic activity (54). In vitro, constituents in chasteberry bind selectively to estrogen receptor beta (19; 20). Apigenin, a flavonoid, has been identified as an active phytoestrogen in chasteberry. According to a systematic review, chastetree may cause adverse effects when used in combination with hormone replacement therapy or oral contraceptives (6).
  • MetoclopramideMetoclopramide: According to a systematic review, chastetree may be contraindicated for use with metacloprami: de (6).

Chasteberry/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • AntiandrogensAntiandrogens: In animals, chasteberry possessed antiandrogenic effects (18), noting that a flavonoid-rich fraction of chasteberry administered to male dogs resulted in disruption of the latter stages of spermatogenesis.
  • AntibacterialsAntibacterials: Ethanolic and etheric extracts of chaste tree demonstrate in vitro antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcusaureus, Streptococcus faecalis (6.5-20% extracts), Salmonella, Escherichia coli (10-20%), Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. pseudotropicalis and C. kruesi (10-40%). Chasteberry extracts have also demonstrated high levels of toxicity against the mycelial growth of Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Epidermophyton floccosum, Microsporum canis, M. gypseum (1.5-12%) and Penicillium virdicatum (9-23%) (50). Essential oil from chasteberry has shown greater activity against E. coli and C. albicans than against S. aureus or Bacillus anthracoides (51). Five flavonoids and two iridoids extracted from Vitex agnus-castus possess inhibitory action against Bacillus cereus, B. megaterium, and Staph. aureus (52).
  • AntidepressantsAntidepressants: In humans, depression scores were lowered with chasteberry use (42; 21; 38).
  • AntipsychoticsAntipsychotics: According to a systematic review, chastetree may be contraindicated for use with antipsychotics (6).
  • ContraceptivesContraceptives: According to in vitro study, chasteberry may increase plasma levels of estrogens and progesterone (19; 20). According to a systematic review, chastetree may cause adverse effects when used in combination with hormone replacement therapy or oral contraceptives (6).
  • DiureticsDiuretics: In humans, participants administered chasteberry showed a significantly lower score for water retention (21).
  • Dopamine agonistsDopamine agonists: The dopaminergic effects of chasteberry extracts have been studied (53). In animal and in vitro studies, chasteberry has been shown to bind to D-2 receptors, inhibiting prolactin secretion (22; 23).
  • Dopamine antagonistsDopamine antagonists: The dopaminergic effects of chasteberry extracts have been studied (53). In animal and in vitro studies, chasteberry has been shown to bind to D-2 receptors, inhibiting prolactin secretion (22; 23).
  • Hormonal agentsHormonal agents: Chasteberry has been studied for modulation of estrogenic activity (54). In vitro, constituents in chasteberry bind selectively to estrogen receptor beta (19; 20). Apigenin, a flavonoid, has been identified as an active phytoestrogen in chasteberry. According to a systematic review, chastetree may cause adverse effects when used in combination with hormone replacement therapy or oral contraceptives (6).
  • Hormone replacement therapyHormone replacement therapy: Chasteberry has been studied for modulation of estrogenic activity (54). In vitro, constituents in chasteberry bind selectively to estrogen receptor beta (19; 20). Apigenin, a flavonoid, has been identified as an active phytoestrogen in chasteberry. According to a systematic review, chastetree may cause adverse effects when used in combination with hormone replacement therapy or oral contraceptives (6).

Chasteberry/Food Interactions:
  • Insufficient available evidence.

Chasteberry/Laboratory Interactions:
  • Androgen levelsAndrogen levels: One animal study suggests that chasteberry possesses antiandrogenic effects (18), noting that a flavonoid-rich fraction of chasteberry administered to male dogs resulted in disruption of the latter stages of spermatogenesis. Reduced androgen production was reflected in low levels of sialic acid in the testes.
  • EstrogenEstrogen: Chasteberry has been studied for modulation of estrogenic activity (54). In vitro, constituents in chasteberry bind selectively to estrogen receptor beta (19; 20). Apigenin, a flavonoid, has been identified as an active phytoestrogen in chasteberry.
  • Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH)Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH): It has been debated whether or not chasteberry alters the secretion of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) or leutinizing hormone (LH). Most clinical trials, however, have found that levels remain unaffected (23; 13).
  • Leutinizing hormone (LH)Leutinizing hormone (LH): It has been debated whether or not chasteberry alters the secretion of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) or leutinizing hormone (LH). Most clinical trials, however, have found that levels remain unaffected (23; 13).
  • ProlactinProlactin: Several controlled trials and pre-clinical studies reported the ability of chasteberry to inhibit prolactin secretion (23; 55; 22; 24; 13; 12). One study demonstrated variable effects (17). In women, the reduction of pathophysiologicaly increased serum prolactin levels has been suggested (56; 13). Another study, however, suggested an increase in prolactin (35).
  • Serum progesteroneSerum progesterone: In humans, average serum progesterone increased (57), however in another study, progesterone levels decreased after chasteberry use (35).

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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