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Chives (Allium schoenoprasum)



Interactions

Chive/Drug Interactions:
  • AntibioticsAntibiotics: Based on in vitro evidence, chive oil and chive extract may exert antibacterial properties against various bacteria, including Escherichia coli (29; 30; 31).
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: Allium species such as garlic have been shown to have antithrombotic effects through fibrinolytic activity and inhibition of platelet aggregation (3). Therefore, other Allium species such as chive may also have anticoagulant effects.
  • Antifungal agentsAntifungal agents: Based on in vitro evidence, constituents of chive may exert antifungal activity (32; 33).
  • Antihypertensive agentsAntihypertensive agents: Allium species such as garlic have been shown to have antihypertensive properties (3). Therefore, other Allium species such as chive may also have these effects.
  • Antilipemic agentsAntilipemic agents: Allium species such as garlic have been shown to lower the concentration of triglycerides, cholesterol, and low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and to increase the concentration of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) in blood (3). Therefore, other Allium species such as chive may also have these effects.
  • Antineoplastic agentsAntineoplastic agents: Based on in vitro evidence, chive may suppress cell growth in various cell lines, including human breast cancer cell lines (34; 32; 35).
  • Antiviral agentsAntiviral agents: Based on in vitro evidence, constituents of Allium tuberosum may exert inhibitory activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (9).
  • Cytochrome P450-metabolized agentsCytochrome P450-metabolized agents: Based on in vitro evidence, Chinese chive has been shown to inhibit CYP3A4-mediated 4-hydroxylation of midazolam (36).
  • Libido-enhancing agentsLibido-enhancing agents: Based on animal evidence, extracts of Chinese chive seed may enhance sexual responsiveness (10).

Chive/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • AntibacterialsAntibacterials: Based on in vitro evidence, chive oil and chive extract may exert antibacterial properties against various bacteria, including Escherichia coli (29; 30; 31).
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: Allium species such as garlic have been shown to have antithrombotic effects through fibrinolytic activity and inhibition of platelet aggregation (3). Therefore, other Allium species such as chive may also have anticoagulant effects.
  • AntifungalsAntifungals: Based on in vitro evidence, constituents of chive may exert antifungal activity (32; 33).
  • AntilipemicsAntilipemics: Allium species such as garlic have been shown to lower the concentration of triglycerides, cholesterol, and LDL and to increase the concentration of HDL in blood (3). Therefore, other Allium species such as chive may also have these effects.
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: Based on in vitro evidence, chive may suppress cell growth in various cell lines, including human breast cancer cell lines (34; 32; 35).
  • AntioxidantsAntioxidants: In animal study, an Allium vegetable diet fed to rats for four weeks showed antioxidative activities, but did not alter the plasma cholesterol profile (37).
  • AntiviralsAntivirals: Based on in vitro evidence, constituents of Allium tuberosum may exert inhibitory activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (9).
  • Cytochrome P450-metabolized herbs and supplementsCytochrome P450-metabolized herbs and supplements: Based on in vitro evidence, Chinese chive has been shown to inhibit CYP3A4-mediated 4-hydroxylation of midazolam (36).
  • HypotensivesHypotensives: Allium species such as garlic have been shown to have antihypertensive properties (3). Therefore, other Allium species such as chive may also have these effects.
  • Libido-enhancing herbs and supplementsLibido-enhancing herbs and supplements: Based on animal evidence, extracts of Chinese chive seed may enhance sexual responsiveness (10).
  • Vitamin AVitamin A: In a study in children, the addition of green and yellow vegetables, including Chinese chive, to the diet was shown to increase vitamin A levels (38). Serum levels of carotenoid, including all-trans-beta-carotene, cis-beta-carotene, cryptoxanthin, and lutein, were significantly increased (39).

Chive/Food Interactions:
  • Foods rich in vitamin AFoods rich in vitamin A: In a study in children, the addition of green and yellow vegetables, including Chinese chive, to the diet was shown to increase vitamin A levels (38). Serum levels of carotenoid, including all-trans-beta-carotene, cis-beta-carotene, cryptoxanthin and lutein, were significantly increased (39).

Chive/Lab Interactions:
  • Blood pressureBlood pressure: Allium species such as garlic have been shown to have antihypertensive properties (3). Therefore, other Allium species such as chive may also have these effects.
  • Coagulation panelCoagulation panel: Allium species such as garlic have been shown to have antithrombotic effects through fibrinolytic activity and the reduction of platelet aggregation (3). Therefore, other Allium species such as chive may also have anticoagulant effects.
  • Lipid profileLipid profile: Allium species such as garlic have been shown to lower the concentration of triglycerides, cholesterol, and LDL and to increase the concentration of HDL in blood (3). Therefore, other Allium species such as chive may also have these effects.
  • Vitamin A levelsVitamin A levels: The addition of green and yellow vegetables, including Chinese chive, to the diet of kindergartners has been shown to increase vitamin A levels (38). Serum levels of carotenoid, including all-trans-beta-carotene, cis-beta-carotene, cryptoxanthin, and lutein, were significantly increased (39).

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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