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Vinpocetine



Interactions

Vinpocetine/Drug Interactions:
  • AntacidsAntacids: Antacids have been reported to reduce vinpocetine plasma levels. However, in healthy human males, the concomitant application of magnesium-aluminum-hydroxide gel, such as that found in antacids, did not influence the absorption of vinpocetine (52).
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: There are conflicting results from in vitro and human studies regarding whether vinpocetine inhibits platelet aggregation (14; 15; 16; 17). It may have additive effects with anticlotting or antiplatelet medications, such as aspirin, Coumadin® (warfarin), heparin, PlavixT (clopidogrel), Ticlid (ticlopidine), or Trental (pentoxifylline) (46). In healthy adult males, the effects of concomitant vinpocetine and warfarin administration were additive; however, the results were not statistically significant (87).
  • Antidiabetic agentsAntidiabetic agents: In chronic ischemic poststroke patients, vinpocetine infusion increased regional cerebral glucose uptake and glucose metabolism in the brain (88; 89). There is evidence from human research that vinpocetine does not interfere with the kinetics of glibenclamide (90).
  • AntihypertensivesAntihypertensives: In humans, vinpocetine combined with hypotensive therapy significantly improved blood flow in cerebral vessels (61).
  • Calcium channel blockersCalcium channel blockers: In vitro, vinpocetine inhibited voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels (53; 54; 55).
  • ImmunosuppressantsImmunosuppressants: In vitro, vinpocetine had a moderate effect on the production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) (91).
  • Phosphodiesterase inhibitorsPhosphodiesterase inhibitors: Vinpocetine is a selective inhibitor of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterase (PDE)-1 enzyme (57).

Vinpocetine/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • AntacidsAntacids: Antacids have been reported to reduce vinpocetine plasma levels. However, in healthy human males, the concomitant application of magnesium-aluminum-hydroxide gel, such as that found in antacids, did not influence the absorption of vinpocetine (52).
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: There are conflicting results from in vitro and human studies regarding whether vinpocetine inhibits platelet aggregation (14; 15; 16; 17). According to secondary sources, several herbs and supplements may increase the activity of vinpocetine due to anticoagulation effects, including alfalfa, American ginseng, angelica, anise, Arnica montana, asafetida, aspen bark, bilberry, birch, black cohosh, bladderwrack, bogbean, boldo, borage seed oil, bromelain, capsicum, cat's claw, celery, chamomile, chaparral, clove, coleus, cordyceps, danshen, devil's claw, dong quai, evening primrose, fenugreek, feverfew, flaxseed and flax powder (not a concern with flaxseed oil), garlic, ginkgo, grapefruit juice, grapeseed, green tea, guggul, gymnestra, horse chestnut, horseradish, licorice root, lovage root, male fern, meadowsweet, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), onion, papain, Panax ginseng, parsley, passionflower, poplar, prickly ash, propolis, quassia, red clover, reishi, saw palmetto, Siberian ginseng, sweet clover, turmeric, vitamin E, white willow, wild carrot, wild lettuce, willow, wintergreen, and yucca.
  • Calcium channel blockersCalcium channel blockers: In vitro, vinpocetine inhibited voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels (53; 54; 55).
  • GarlicGarlic: According to secondary sources, based on mechanism of action (anticoagulation), garlic may increase the activity of vinpocetine.
  • Green teaGreen tea: According to secondary sources, based on mechanism of action (anticoagulation), green tea may increase the activity of vinpocetine.
  • HypoglycemicsHypoglycemics: In chronic ischemic poststroke patients, vinpocetine infusion increased regional cerebral glucose uptake and glucose metabolism in the brain (88; 89).
  • HypotensivesHypotensives: In humans, vinpocetine combined with hypotensive therapy significantly improved blood flow in cerebral vessels (61).
  • ImmunomodulatorsImmunomodulators: In vitro, vinpocetine had moderate effects on the production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) (91). Vinpocetine did not affect monocyte viability and production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1-beta elicited from endotoxin-stimulated human monocytes (92).
  • OnionOnion: According to secondary sources, based on mechanism of action (anticoagulation), onion may increase the activity of vinpocetine.
  • Phosphatidylserine (PS)Phosphatidylserine (PS): According to secondary sources, phosphatidylserine may increase the activity of vinpocetine. Further information is lacking at this time.
  • ScopolamineScopolamine: Vinpocetine decreased the disrupting effect of scopolamine on acquisition and prevented and reinstituted memory loss in mice impaired by scopolamine (93).

Vinpocetine/Food Interactions:
  • GeneralGeneral: The bioavailability of vinpocetine was improved by 60-100% when taken with food (94).
  • CitrusCitrus: According to in vitro research, the addition of citric acid increased the release of vinpocetine from a hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) drug matrix (95).
  • GarlicGarlic: According to secondary sources, based on mechanism of action (anticoagulation), garlic may increase the activity of vinpocetine.
  • OnionOnion: According to secondary sources, based on mechanism of action (anticoagulation), onion may increase the activity of vinpocetine.
  • SodiumSodium: Vinpocetine inhibited glutamate and aspartate release evoked by the elevation of internal sodium (96).

Vinpocetine/Lab Interactions:
  • Blood panelBlood panel: In humans, vinpocetine significantly decreased red blood cell aggregation, hematocrit, whole blood and plasma viscosity, and red blood cell aggregation (p<0.05) (58; 59; 60). According to reviews, vinpocetine is effective in improving mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and inhibited the aggregation of thrombocytes (97; 98).
  • Blood pressureBlood pressure: Vinpocetine has been observed to slightly reduce blood pressure (51; 39).
  • Coagulation panelCoagulation panel: Studies in vitro and in healthy volunteers have reported that vinpocetine inhibited platelet aggregation (14; 15; 99). However, one study reported that vinpocetine had no effect on platelets (17).
  • Creatinine levelsCreatinine levels: A decline in serum creatinine has been noted with vinpocetine use (51; 39).
  • CytokinesCytokines: In vitro, vinpocetine had a moderate effect on the production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-alpha and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) (91). Vinpocetine did not affect monocyte viability and production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1-beta elicited from endotoxin-stimulated human monocytes at 10mcM or lower concentrations (92).
  • GlucoseGlucose: In elderly patients with cerebral dysfunction, vinpocetine caused a reduction in serum glucose levels (43). In chronic ischemic poststroke patients, vinpocetine infusion increased regional cerebral glucose uptake and glucose metabolism in the peristroke region, as well as in intact brain tissue (88). An earlier study had reported that an intravenous infusion of vinpocetine did not significantly affect the regional or global metabolic rates of glucose in stroke patients; however, glucose transport was strongly affected in the whole brain, in the contralateral hemisphere, and in the peri-infarct area of the symptomatic hemisphere (89).
  • HemoglobinHemoglobin: In patients with vascular dementia of the Binswanger type, vinpocetine (15mg daily for three weeks) significantly increased the oxygen affinity of hemoglobin (100). According to secondary sources, in humans, vinpocetine enhanced the oxygen release of hemoglobin in the brain.
  • Lipid panelLipid panel: A decline in serum triglyceride has been noted with vinpocetine use (51; 39).
  • Nitric oxideNitric oxide: In humans, vinpocetine combined with hypotensive therapy significantly increased the content of nitric oxide in blood serum (61)
  • White blood cell countWhite blood cell count: In elderly patients with cerebral dysfunction, vinpocetine caused a reduction in white blood cell counts (43).

Copyright © 2011 Natural Standard (www.naturalstandard.com)


The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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